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Is Crack Cocaine Safe?

CRACK

Facts About Crack Cocaine

The Truth about Crack Cocaine provides the facts about this widely-used and dangerous form of cocaine.

Street names for crack cocaine:

STREET NAMES

CRACK COCAINEOf the dozens of street terms for crack cocaine in use today, the most common are:
24-7

Apple jacks

Badrock

Ball

Base

Beat

Candy

Chemical

Cloud

Cookies

Crack

Crumbs

Crunch & munch

Devil drug

Dice

Electric kool-aid

Fat bags

French fries

Glo

Gravel

Grit

Hail

Hard ball

Hard rock

Hotcakes

Ice cube

Jelly beans

Kryptonite

Nuggets

Paste

Piece

Prime time

Product

Raw

Rock(s)

Rock star

Rox/Roxanne

Scrabble

Sleet

Snow coke

Sugar block

Topo (Spanish)

Tornado

Troop


View On-Line:
Click here to Read The Truth About Cocaine Booklet

Crack cocaine is heated and smoked. It is so named because it makes a cracking or popping sound when heated. The most potent form in which cocaine appears, “crack” is also the riskiest. It is between 75 and 100% pure, far stronger and more potent than regular cocaine. It comes in solid blocks or crystals, varying in color from yellow to pale rose or white.

Smoking any substance allows it to reach the brain more quickly than other routes. Smoking crack thus brings an intense and immediate — but very short-lived — “high” that lasts about 15 minutes. And because addiction will develop even more rapidly if the substance is smoked rather than snorted, an abuser can become addicted after the first time trying crack.

Because of cocaine’s high cost, it has long been considered a “rich man’s drug.” Crack, on the other hand, is sold at prices so low that even teens can afford to buy it — at first. The truth is, however, that once a person is addicted, the expense skyrockets in direct ratio to the increasing amount needed to support the habit.

Short-term Effects:

Crack causes a short-lived, intense “high” that is immediately followed by the opposite — intense depression, edginess and a craving for more of the drug. People who use it often don’t eat or sleep properly. They can experience greatly increased heart rates, muscle spasms and convulsions. The drug can make people feel paranoid, angry, hostile and anxious — even when they aren’t “high”.

Smoking crack can also cause severe chest pains, lung trauma and bleeding. Regardless of how much the drug is used or how frequently, cocaine increases the likelihood that the user will experience a heart attack, stroke, seizures or respiratory failure — any of which can result in sudden death.

Long-term Effects:

As tolerance to the drug increases, it becomes necessary to take greater and greater quantities to get the same “high.” Prolonged daily use causes sleep deprivation and loss of appetite. A person can become psychotic and begin to experience hallucinations.

As cocaine interferes with the way the brain processes chemicals, one needs more and more of the drug just to feel “normal.” People who become addicted to cocaine (as with most other drugs) lose interest in life.

Coming down from the drug causes severe depression, which becomes deeper and deeper after each use. This can get so severe that a person will do almost anything to get the drug — even commit murder. And if he or she can’t get cocaine, the depression can get so intense it can drive the addict to suicide.

Download Online | Click here to Read The Truth About Cocaine Booklet

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  1. September 3, 2008 at 5:23 am

    Cocaine, however, wears off much more rapidly, leaving the user more intoxicated than he thought he was. This situation increases the chance of suffering the worst of alcohol’s debilitating effects, including slowed respiration, vomiting, and loss of consciousness. Alcohol and cocaine also combine in the human liver manufacturing a third substance.
    ——————
    Ricky

    Crack Cocaine

  2. john
    September 17, 2008 at 3:00 am

    u trippin

    ive smoked crack for 20 years and all ive gotten was a little neaseaus once in a while

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