Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder’

psychiatry is DEAD WRONG

October 21, 2010 Leave a comment

https://i0.wp.com/www.cchr.org/assets/videos/640_thumbs/dead_wrong_doc.jpgWatch a mother’s unfortunate tragedy after placing her trust and the health of her child into the hands of a psychiatrist.

Watch Video Here >>

Having received a “drive-thru window” diagnosis and prescription of Lexapro, this family would never be the same again.

You’ll learn about the “chemical imbalance” scam that’s allowing the psychiatric industry to rake in billions of dollars from unsuspecting citizens.

Watching this very real account of a mother, who could have been any one of our own mothers, was truly an emotional roller coaster…

Watch Video Here >>

Advertisements

What’s Wrong with Teen Screen?

August 12, 2010 Leave a comment

In the last four weeks: Have you had trouble sleeping, that is, trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early?  Have you had less energy than you usually do? Has doing even little things made you feel really tired?  Has it often been hard for you to make up your mind or to make decisions?  Have you often had trouble keeping your mind on your schoolwork/work or other things? Have you often felt grouchy or irritable and often in a bad mood, when even little things would make you mad?  Have you gained a lot of weight, more than just a few pounds?  Have you lost weight, more than just a few pounds?

These are a few of the questions being asked to adolescents in a mental health screening program used in schools across the nation.  If a child answers ‘yes’ to these or a set number of other equally inane questions, they’re considered likely to be depressed-or worse.

Full Story >>

Is There Such Thing as a Psychiatric Disorder?

August 12, 2010 Leave a comment

mental disorders psychiatric disease adhd bipolar depression attention deficit disorderThe psychiatric/pharmaceutical industry spends billions of dollars a year in order to convince the public, legislators and the press that psychiatric disorders such as Bi-Polar Disorder, Depression, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, etc., are medical diseases on par with verifiable medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease.  Yet unlike real medical disease, there are no scientific tests to verify the medical existence of any psychiatric disorder.  To counter this obvious flaw in their push to medicalize behaviors, the psychiatric industry will claim that there are certain medical conditions that do not have a verifiable test so this is why there isn’t one for “mental illness.”  This is frankly a lame argument; Whereas there may be rare medical conditions that do not have a verifiable medical test, there are virtually no psychiatric disorders that can be verified medically as a physical abnormality/disease.  Not one.

In fact the “brain scans” that have been pawned off as evidence that schizophrenia or depression are brain diseases, are simply bogus.  Most have not been done on drug naive patients, meaning someone who has not been on psychiatric drugs such as antipsychotic drugs, documented to cause brain atrophy (shrinkage).  Other brain scans have shown the brains of smaller children to show smaller brains in comparison to larger/older children and then claimed children with ADHD have smaller brains. None have been conclusively proven to verify mental disorders as abnormalities of the brain.

If there were such verifiable brain scans, or in fact any medical/scientific test that could show a physical/medical abnormality for any psychiatric disorder, the public would be getting such tests prior to being administered psychiatric drugs. Read More >>

Is Alcohol a Drug?

July 26, 2010 Leave a comment

Photo credits: Stockxpert It is classed as a depressant, meaning that it slows down vital functions—resulting in slurred speech, unsteady movement, disturbed perceptions and an inability to react quickly.

As for how it affects the mind, it is best understood as a drug that reduces a person’s ability to think rationally and distorts his or her judgment.

Although classified as a depressant, the amount of alcohol consumed determines the type of effect. Most people drink for the stimulant effect, such as a beer or glass of wine taken to “loosen up.” But if a person consumes more than the body can handle, they then experience alcohol’s depressant effect. They start to feel “stupid” or lose coordination and control.

Alcohol overdose causes even more severe depressant effects (inability to feel pain, toxicity where the body vomits the poison, and finally unconsciousness or, worse, coma or death from severe toxic overdose). These reactions depend on how much is consumed and how quickly.

There are different kinds of alcohol. Ethyl alcohol (ethanol), the only alcohol used in beverages, is produced by the fermentation of grains and fruits. Fermenting is a chemical process whereby yeast acts upon certain ingredients in the food, creating alcohol.

Learn More >>

Free Human Rights Information Kit

July 25, 2010 2 comments
Containing steps to safeguard oneself and others from the dangers of psychotropic drugs, this kit provides hard-hitting facts and recommendations to help you save lives.

The kit includes Making a Killing—The untold Story of Psychotropic Drugging, an award-winning documentary film presenting the cold, hard facts you have the right to know. Containing more than 175 interviews with lawyers, mental health experts, the families of victims and the survivors themselves, this riveting documentary rips the mask off psychotropic drugging and exposes a brutal but well-entrenched money-making machine.

Free kit here >

Making a Killing

July 25, 2010 Leave a comment

Watch the UNTOLD story of psychotropic drugging

Psychotropic drugs. It’s the story of big money—drugs that fuel a $330 billion psychiatric industry, without a single cure. The cost in human terms is even greater—these drugs now kill an estimated 42,000 people every year. And the death count keeps rising. Containing more than 175 interviews with lawyers, mental health experts, the families of victims and the survivors themselves, this riveting documentary rips the mask off psychotropic drugging and exposes a brutal but well-entrenched money-making machine.

Watch Making a Killing

Have you ever wondered why more and more people are being prescribed psychiatric medications for disorders?

April 19, 2008 Leave a comment

Where did these disorders come from? Did they always exist and we never had a way to deal with them in the past? Are they something new as a result of something about our current lifestyles? Is it just a new way to make money? Is it a legalization of drugs that somehow slipped into the medical profession? Is there any validity to taking drugs for your problems or are you masking your problems? Are legal drugs fine to take because they make you feel better? What’s the difference between legal drugs and illegal drugs? Are there any long term negative effects from taking psychotropic medication? Why did Americans pay $11.9 billion for antidepressants, just in the U.S., in 2007? Are there other solutions to taking antidepressants that we don’t even know about? Is it a secret that a placebo is more effective in treating bipolar disorder than an antidepressant? And does that mean that because 20 percent of all antidepressant sales are to treat bipolar disorder that billions of American dollars are spent needlessly? Do people that have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder know how effective antidepressants are to treat it? Does the medical profession accurately explain the side effects of antidepressants for new patients? Do psychiatrists have any other solution for their patients other than prescribing psychiatric medication? Are your “problems” somebody else’s profit? Are consumers really being protected by the medical profession? Are medical students taught anything else but to prescribe drugs? Are there alternate methods for treating “disorders”? Taking psychotropics drugs must work or there wouldn’t be so many people taking it, right? Than why can’t any psychiatrist say they’ve ever cured anyone?

Is it all just a big marketing campaign?