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Posts Tagged ‘Raves’

psychiatry is DEAD WRONG

October 21, 2010 Leave a comment

https://i0.wp.com/www.cchr.org/assets/videos/640_thumbs/dead_wrong_doc.jpgWatch a mother’s unfortunate tragedy after placing her trust and the health of her child into the hands of a psychiatrist.

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Having received a “drive-thru window” diagnosis and prescription of Lexapro, this family would never be the same again.

You’ll learn about the “chemical imbalance” scam that’s allowing the psychiatric industry to rake in billions of dollars from unsuspecting citizens.

Watching this very real account of a mother, who could have been any one of our own mothers, was truly an emotional roller coaster…

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Is There Such Thing as a Psychiatric Disorder?

August 12, 2010 Leave a comment

mental disorders psychiatric disease adhd bipolar depression attention deficit disorderThe psychiatric/pharmaceutical industry spends billions of dollars a year in order to convince the public, legislators and the press that psychiatric disorders such as Bi-Polar Disorder, Depression, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, etc., are medical diseases on par with verifiable medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes and heart disease.  Yet unlike real medical disease, there are no scientific tests to verify the medical existence of any psychiatric disorder.  To counter this obvious flaw in their push to medicalize behaviors, the psychiatric industry will claim that there are certain medical conditions that do not have a verifiable test so this is why there isn’t one for “mental illness.”  This is frankly a lame argument; Whereas there may be rare medical conditions that do not have a verifiable medical test, there are virtually no psychiatric disorders that can be verified medically as a physical abnormality/disease.  Not one.

In fact the “brain scans” that have been pawned off as evidence that schizophrenia or depression are brain diseases, are simply bogus.  Most have not been done on drug naive patients, meaning someone who has not been on psychiatric drugs such as antipsychotic drugs, documented to cause brain atrophy (shrinkage).  Other brain scans have shown the brains of smaller children to show smaller brains in comparison to larger/older children and then claimed children with ADHD have smaller brains. None have been conclusively proven to verify mental disorders as abnormalities of the brain.

If there were such verifiable brain scans, or in fact any medical/scientific test that could show a physical/medical abnormality for any psychiatric disorder, the public would be getting such tests prior to being administered psychiatric drugs. Read More >>

Is Alcohol a Drug?

July 26, 2010 Leave a comment

Photo credits: Stockxpert It is classed as a depressant, meaning that it slows down vital functions—resulting in slurred speech, unsteady movement, disturbed perceptions and an inability to react quickly.

As for how it affects the mind, it is best understood as a drug that reduces a person’s ability to think rationally and distorts his or her judgment.

Although classified as a depressant, the amount of alcohol consumed determines the type of effect. Most people drink for the stimulant effect, such as a beer or glass of wine taken to “loosen up.” But if a person consumes more than the body can handle, they then experience alcohol’s depressant effect. They start to feel “stupid” or lose coordination and control.

Alcohol overdose causes even more severe depressant effects (inability to feel pain, toxicity where the body vomits the poison, and finally unconsciousness or, worse, coma or death from severe toxic overdose). These reactions depend on how much is consumed and how quickly.

There are different kinds of alcohol. Ethyl alcohol (ethanol), the only alcohol used in beverages, is produced by the fermentation of grains and fruits. Fermenting is a chemical process whereby yeast acts upon certain ingredients in the food, creating alcohol.

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Free Human Rights Information Kit

July 25, 2010 2 comments
Containing steps to safeguard oneself and others from the dangers of psychotropic drugs, this kit provides hard-hitting facts and recommendations to help you save lives.

The kit includes Making a Killing—The untold Story of Psychotropic Drugging, an award-winning documentary film presenting the cold, hard facts you have the right to know. Containing more than 175 interviews with lawyers, mental health experts, the families of victims and the survivors themselves, this riveting documentary rips the mask off psychotropic drugging and exposes a brutal but well-entrenched money-making machine.

Free kit here >

Making a Killing

July 25, 2010 Leave a comment

Watch the UNTOLD story of psychotropic drugging

Psychotropic drugs. It’s the story of big money—drugs that fuel a $330 billion psychiatric industry, without a single cure. The cost in human terms is even greater—these drugs now kill an estimated 42,000 people every year. And the death count keeps rising. Containing more than 175 interviews with lawyers, mental health experts, the families of victims and the survivors themselves, this riveting documentary rips the mask off psychotropic drugging and exposes a brutal but well-entrenched money-making machine.

Watch Making a Killing

psychiatrists admit (on video) they are a fraud

March 4, 2008 4 comments

Watch the video, where psychiatrists, themselves admit their “profession” is a fraud. And there is no validity to their diagnosis.

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Is Bipolar Disorder real?

March 1, 2008 14 comments

Fifty-one year old Anne, a mother of five, was prescribed antidepressants for bipolar disorder, after experiencing recurrent emotional struggles.  However, her decelerating menstrual cycle was never medically explored and, as was established with a competent physical examination, she really suffered from menopause.

Today, millions of people are wrongly diagnosed with a disorder from the American Psychiatric Associations Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, without ever being properly physically examined or having the disorder scientifically or medically confirmed.  The quick fix drug response to behavioral or emotional problems is turning Aldous Huxleys Brave New World into reality.

Facts:

Studies confirm that undiagnosed and untreated medical conditions manifest as psychiatric symptoms, yet patients presented to a psychiatrist are automatically labeled as mentally ill.  One study determined that 83% of people referred by clinics and social workers to psychiatrists had undiagnosed physical illnesses.

Dr. Loren Mosher, the former head of schizophrenia studies at the National Institute of Mental Health developed a successful non-drug approach to treating schizophrenia. Its success, however, was a threat to a pharmaceutical-run mental health industry and funding was subsequently cut.

In an eight-year study, the World Health Organization found that patients in economically disadvantaged countries that didnt have access to unlimited supplies of psychotropic drugs, fared dramatically better than patients in the U.S. and other developed countries that relied upon psychotropic drugs.  After five years, 64% of the patients in the poor countries were without symptoms of schizophrenia and functioning well.  In contrast, only 18% of the patients in the prosperous countries did well.

Psychiatric drug sales are a $27 billion a year industry in the United States alone, often thwarting any attempts to provide workable medical care for people suffering mental or emotional problems.