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Posts Tagged ‘Solutions’

What’s Wrong with Teen Screen?

August 12, 2010 Leave a comment

In the last four weeks: Have you had trouble sleeping, that is, trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early?  Have you had less energy than you usually do? Has doing even little things made you feel really tired?  Has it often been hard for you to make up your mind or to make decisions?  Have you often had trouble keeping your mind on your schoolwork/work or other things? Have you often felt grouchy or irritable and often in a bad mood, when even little things would make you mad?  Have you gained a lot of weight, more than just a few pounds?  Have you lost weight, more than just a few pounds?

These are a few of the questions being asked to adolescents in a mental health screening program used in schools across the nation.  If a child answers ‘yes’ to these or a set number of other equally inane questions, they’re considered likely to be depressed-or worse.

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Are Drugs Bad For You?

July 25, 2010 Leave a comment

Drugs have been part of our culture since the middle of the last century. Popularized in the 1960s by music and mass media, they invade all aspects of society.

An estimated 208 million people internationally consume illegal drugs. In the United States, results from the 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health showed that 19.9 million Americans (or 8% of the population aged 12 or older) used illegal drugs in the month prior to the survey.

You probably know someone who has been affected by drugs, directly or indirectly.

The most commonly used—and abused—drug in the US is alcohol. Alcohol-related motor accidents are the second leading cause of teen death in the United States.

The most commonly used illegal drug is marijuana. According to the United Nations 2008 World Drug Report, about 3.9% of the world’s population between the ages of 15 and 64 abuse marijuana.

Young people today are exposed earlier than ever to drugs. Based on a survey by the Centers for Disease Control in 2007, 45% of high school students nationwide drank alcohol and 19.7% smoked pot during a one-month period.

In Europe, recent studies among 15- and 16-year-olds suggest that use of marijuana varies from under 10% to over 40%, with the highest rates reported by teens in the Czech Republic (44%), followed by Ireland (39%), the UK (38%) and France (38%). In Spain and the United Kingdom, cocaine use among 15- to 16-year-olds is 4% to 6%. Cocaine use among young people has risen in Denmark, Italy, Spain, UK, Norway and France.

Click here to learn more and find out for yourself.

Have you ever wondered why more and more people are being prescribed psychiatric medications for disorders?

April 19, 2008 Leave a comment

Where did these disorders come from? Did they always exist and we never had a way to deal with them in the past? Are they something new as a result of something about our current lifestyles? Is it just a new way to make money? Is it a legalization of drugs that somehow slipped into the medical profession? Is there any validity to taking drugs for your problems or are you masking your problems? Are legal drugs fine to take because they make you feel better? What’s the difference between legal drugs and illegal drugs? Are there any long term negative effects from taking psychotropic medication? Why did Americans pay $11.9 billion for antidepressants, just in the U.S., in 2007? Are there other solutions to taking antidepressants that we don’t even know about? Is it a secret that a placebo is more effective in treating bipolar disorder than an antidepressant? And does that mean that because 20 percent of all antidepressant sales are to treat bipolar disorder that billions of American dollars are spent needlessly? Do people that have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder know how effective antidepressants are to treat it? Does the medical profession accurately explain the side effects of antidepressants for new patients? Do psychiatrists have any other solution for their patients other than prescribing psychiatric medication? Are your “problems” somebody else’s profit? Are consumers really being protected by the medical profession? Are medical students taught anything else but to prescribe drugs? Are there alternate methods for treating “disorders”? Taking psychotropics drugs must work or there wouldn’t be so many people taking it, right? Than why can’t any psychiatrist say they’ve ever cured anyone?

Is it all just a big marketing campaign?

They said drugs would make you cool… video

October 27, 2007 Leave a comment

 

They said drugs would make you cool…

You have to watch this video.

Joints

They said drugs would
make you cool…

Kids, on Drugs

October 27, 2007 2 comments

The Truth About Drugs

A public service short film from Kids on Stage for a Better World.

Written and Directed by Laurie Bartilson.

Why is Cocaine so Addictive?

October 26, 2007 2 comments

Of all drugs, cocaine creates the greatest psychological dependence. It stimulates key pleasure centers within the brain and causes extremely heightened euphoria. However, an individual quickly develops a tolerance to the drug, requiring higher dosages and more frequent use in order to get the same effect. Cocaine cravings can be so strong that just the memory of the euphoria associated with use of the drug can trigger the desire to use it again, even after long periods of abstinence.

Deadly combinations of drugs.

Cocaine is sometimes taken with other drugs, including tranquilizers, amphetamines, marijuana and heroin. Such combinations greatly magnify the danger of using cocaine. In addition to the likelihood of developing a two-drug habit, one can easily create a mixture of narcotics that proves fatal.

Hashish: A dangerous road toward cocaine addiction

A hashish or marijuana user is ten times more likely to become a cocaine or heroin addict than a cigarette smoker is to develop lung cancer.

“I had no more future. I did not see how I could escape my cocaine dependence. I was lost. I was ‘exploding’ and unable to stop myself from continuing to seriously abuse cocaine. I had hallucinations that animals were crawling under my skin. I felt them each time that I shot up and scraped myself with the point of my syringe until I started bleeding in order to make them leave. I was once bleeding so heavily from this I ended up in the hospital.”

Cocaine causes heart, kidney, brain and lung damage. What are the sort-term effects of cocaine? All drugs are poisons. The amount you take determines how a drug will effect you. A small amount can make you feel euphoric, energetic, talkative and mentally alert. Larger doses put you to sleep. An even larger dose can kill you. This is true of cocaine or any drug.

Initially, a cocaine high may last from 15 to 30 minutes, but as one’s tolerance to the drug increases, the high may last only 5 to 10 minutes, requiring increasingly larger and larger amounts of the drug to get the same effect.

Quantities of several hundred milligrams or more intensify the user’s high, but lead to bizarre, erratic and violent behavior. A person on the drug can experience tremors, dizziness, muscle twitches and paranoia. The drug can react on the heart, resulting in heart attack, seizures and failure in breathing.

What are the long-term effects of cocaine?

The phrase “dope fiend” was originally coined many years ago to describe the negative side-effects of constant cocaine use. As tolerance to the drug increases, it becomes necessary to take greater and greater quantities to get the same effects. Prolonged daily use causes sleep deprivation and loss of appetite. A person can become psychotic and begin to experience hallucinations.

Coming down from the drug causes severe depression, a state that becomes deeper and deeper with each repeated use of the drug. In this condition, a person will do almost anything to get it, including commit murder. And if one cannot get cocaine, the depression can deepen to such a degree that he or she becomes suicidal.

“Don’t touch cocaine. I spent two years in jail because I took this drug. And when I got out, life was so hard I started taking the drug again. I know ten girls who became prostitutes because of coke. It’s much more extreme and degrading than we believe. At the time we take it, we don’t realize to what degree it is destroying us.”

The effects of cocaine and crack

Physiological Effects

  • increased heart rate and breathing
  • increased blood pressure
  • heart palpitations
  • weight loss, loss of appetite
  • uncontrollable tremors
  • insomnia
  • rapid breathing
  • muscle twitches
  • fever
  • pale, sickly complexion
  • impotence
  • dilated pupils
  • cold sweats
  • fatigue
  • constipation
  • headaches
  • blurred vision
  • seizures
  • nasal congestion

Changes in Personality/Behavior

  • lying
  • stealing
  • loss of ambition
  • short temper
  • irresponsibility
  • inability to hold a job
  • depression
  • feeling confused
  • prone to accidents
  • hallucinations
  • anxiety
  • paranoia
  • fits of panic
  • poor concentration
  • loss of interest in sex
  • dulled emotions
  • suicidal tendencies

Read The Truth About Cocaine Booklet

Download all drug booklets

A Deadly White Powder

October 26, 2007 Leave a comment

Cocaine is one of the oldest and most dangerous drugs known to man. It is highly addictive and once a person begins taking it, it is almost impossible to free oneself from its grip. Today, cocaine is a world-wide, multi-billion dollar enterprise. Once considered a “rich man’s drug,” a young person today can buy a few grams of cocaine for little more than the cost of a movie ticket.

“You believe that coke will increase your perceptions, that it will allow you to surpass yourself, that you will be able to control things. It’s bloody nonsense. Soon you won’t pay your bills, you won’t bathe anymore, you give up your friends, your family. You will become defenseless and alone.”

But cocaine is very addictive. It can cause death from respiratory failure, stroke, cerebral hemorrhage or heart attack. Babies born to cocaine-addicted mothers are born addicts themselves. And many suffer birth defects, irreversible genetic damage and many other problems.

Cocaine use continues to flourish, even though the drug is so dangerous. Perhaps this is due to the large amount of false information about the drug that results in increasing numbers of people becoming trapped in the grip of addiction, unable to escape.

Learn more